Donderdag 26 februari

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gogogoo
0
jeroengp01
0
www.iex.nl/columns/columns_artikel.as...

And any number of potential acquirers might be attracted to the Dutch company Crucell, which at $1.26 billion is the largest independent vaccine maker. Crucell was left at the altar last month when Wyeth abandoned friendly takeover talks to sell itself to Pfizer. Now a half-dozen other companies are checking out Crucell, analysts say.




Kortom, wederom het bewijs dat Crucell een mooi potentieel heeft.
eddy59
0
vandaag weer een grote flipperkast maar weinig beleggers willen spelen. Meestal eindigen we na al dat geflipper in de plus.
Het is de laatste dagen erg stil aan het front, ik verwacht binnenkort weer een vlam in de pijp. Nog 23 werkdagen en het eerste kwartaal zit er weer op.
Tik tak tik tak.........

Eddy

gogogoo
0
quote:

wilb52 schreef:


Mijn idee, is dat ze NIET worden overgenomen


Mijn idee is dat Crucell 1 van de weinige ondernemingen is die een winstgroei zal laten zien de komende tijd.
aossa
0
Voorkennis !

Vanavond om 8:00u Science Express (online pre-print) lezen.

Wie post 'em het eerst ?
@Oya: krijgen *we het artikel in de e-mail bus?

* = selectief clubje aandeelhouders
nelis h
0
quote:

aossa schreef:


Voorkennis !

Vanavond om 8:00u Science Express (online pre-print) lezen.

Wie post 'em het eerst ?
@Oya: krijgen *we het artikel in de e-mail bus?

* = selectief clubje aandeelhouders


Email dit dan gewoon naar Oya ipv dat je hier onderscheid maakt in aandeelhouders
gocrucellgo
0
aossa
0
Genzyme achieves promising results using STAR™
technology.
hugin.info/132631/R/1146394/218126.pdf

www.iex.nl/forum/topic.asp?forum=228&...

STAR: één van de twee, of beide ?
(Ik gok op MS)

www.genzyme.be/corp/begenz/be_p_ci_ge...

Two of Genzyme’s main therapies will be manufactured in the Geel facility:

A monoclonal antibody for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The treatment is also being evaluated in a number of clinical trials for treatment of other cancers and multiple sclerosis. Regulatory approval for commercial production of this product in Geel is expected in 2009-2010.

An enzyme therapy product for the treatment of Pompe disease, a rare but often fatal genetic muscle disorder. The product was recently approved for treatment in Europe and the US. Regulatory approval for commercial production of this product in Geel is expected in 2009.
aossa
0
quote:

nelis h schreef:


[quote=aossa]
Voorkennis !

Vanavond om 8:00u Science Express (online pre-print) lezen.

Wie post 'em het eerst ?
@Oya: krijgen *we het artikel in de e-mail bus?

* = selectief clubje aandeelhouders
[/quote]

Email dit dan gewoon naar Oya ipv dat je hier onderscheid maakt in aandeelhouders

Krijg jij geen e-mails van Oya ?
investors.crucell.com/C/132631/press_...
aossa
1
quote:

nelis h schreef:


ah op die manier aossa
ok

Laatste tijd is ze 'werkenloos'... een beetje aanporren kan geen kwaad imo!
B_B
4
Feb 26 2009, 11:22 AM EST

Newly Discovered Antibody May Provide Protection against Broad Variety of Flu Viruses
GEN News Highlights

Scientists at Scripps Research and Crucell have found an immune system molecule that attacks what the investigators call the Achilles heel of a wide range of influenza viruses including those responsible for past global pandemics, those causing current common infections, and strains of bird flu expected to pose future problems.

So far, the researchers have shown the this molecule, called CR6261, works against many of the 16 different subtypes of influenza viruses. The antibody neutralized every H1 virus that the group tested, including those that have caused pandemics over the past 100 years. The antibody also worked on the H5 bird viruses that are not yet circulating in humans.

The CR6261 antibody, however, was not effective for the H3 subclass, which is a common human influenza virus, because a sugar molecule blocks the epitope. “If a sugar is the only impediment in the way, we think there is a way around that in vaccine design,” according to Ian Wilson, a professor in the department of molecular biology at Scripps Research.

The researchers extracted white blood cells from a healthy immunized volunteer to make a library of antibodies to look for antibodies that interact with viruses that the donor could not have come into contact with before, such as H5 avian influenza that has spread only from chickens to humans but not from humans to humans.

They found one such antibody, CR6261, in the blood of a donor who had recently been vaccinated with a flu shot to protect against H1 influenza virus. Crucell previously demonstrated in preclinical experiments that this antibody can neutralize common, seasonal flu viruses.

CR6261-like antibodies have now also been reportedly found in other people. It is likely that many people, if not all, have these antibodies, but the body doesn't always produce or use them efficiently, the investigators explain.

The researchers then tried to understand exactly how CR6261 recognized and responded to such a broad array of influenza viruses. To do that, the team solved two crystal structures: one with the antibody bound to the hemagglutinin H1 virus that caused the 1918 pandemic and another with the antibody glued to the hemagglutinin from the 2004 Vietnam H5 avian influenza.

The found that CR6261 latches on to the epitope of a virus, or the so-called stalk of the mushroom-like hemagglutinin particle. Most antibodies try to attack the mushroom cap of hemagglutinin proteins, because that is much more accessible.

Furthermore, when the scientists analyzed the genome of more than 5,000 different influenza viruses, they found that the epitope's sequence is nearly identical in all of them, suggesting that this part of the virus is much more highly conserved than the virus’ constantly mutating cap and thus a good target.

This insight into the way the CR6261 antibody binds to the virus' structure makes sense, the researchers say. It helps explains why the antibody may not be as powerful as it needs to be to attack influenza. “The epitope it needs to latch on to is at the base of the stalk of the hemagglutinin protein, so it is difficult to get to because these proteins are packed together tightly on the viral coat,” says first author, Damian Ekiert, a graduate student in the Scripps Research Kellogg School of Science and Technology.

“Plus, most antibodies try to attack the mushroom cap of the hemagglutinin proteins, because that is much more accessible, and so this probably sets up a huge competition between antibodies.”

The next step now is to figure out how to suppress reactivity with those regions and enhance the immune system's attack on this conserved epitope.

The team’s findings are published in the February 26 issue of Science Expres
aossa
0
quote:

aossa schreef:


Voorkennis !

Vanavond om 8:00u Science Express (online pre-print) lezen.

Wie post 'em het eerst ?
@Oya: krijgen *we het artikel in de e-mail bus?

* = selectief clubje aandeelhouders

Many tankx to Grand Cru ...
www.iex.nl/forum/topic.asp?forum=228&...
Bijlage:
eddy59
0
Respect voor de forum leden die ons met uitstekende informatie voorzien.

Een oprecht bedankje,
Eddy
[verwijderd]
0
quote:

eddy59 schreef:


Respect voor de forum leden die ons met uitstekende informatie voorzien.

Een oprecht bedankje,
Eddy




www.reuters.com/article/rbss HealthcareNews/idUSN2641112820090226

[verwijderd]
0
quote:

wildspieker schreef:


[quote=eddy59]
Respect voor de forum leden die ons met uitstekende informatie voorzien.

Een oprecht bedankje,
Eddy

[/quote]


www.reuters.com/article/rbss HealthcareNews/idUSN2641112820090226

Second team finds natural super flu fighter
Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:37pm EST Email | Print | Share| Reprints | Single Page[-] Text [+]
Market News
Stocks rise as financials offset healthcare
U.S. workers on jobless benefits at record high | Video
Analysts see U.S. government's move as a net positive for banks
More Business & Investing News... WASHINGTON, Feb 26 (Reuters) - An antibody being developed by a Dutch drug company chokes off both seasonal flu and the H5N1 avian flu virus and might offer a way to develop better treatments and vaccines, researchers reported on Thursday.

Crucell NV's (CRCL.AS) antibody, a naturally occurring immune system protein, grabs onto a hidden part of flu viruses, stopping them from infecting cells, they reported in the journal Science.

It is the second report in a week to find antibodies that can interfere with a range of strains of flu -- one of the hardest viruses to fight because it mutates so much.

"This is very exciting because it marks the first step toward the Holy Grail of influenza vaccinology -- the development of a durable and cross-protective universal influenza virus vaccine," Ian Wilson, a researcher at he Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, who helped lead the research, said in a statement.

"Such a flu vaccine could be given to a person just once and act as a universal protectant for most subtypes of influenza, even against pandemic viruses."

On Sunday, another research team said they had found a batch of antibodies that do something similar.

Flu vaccines and drugs focus on proteins found on the surface of the flu virus called hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, which give influenza A viruses their names, as in H5N1 or H1N1.

Hemagglutinin is a lollipop-shaped structure with a big, round head. This head is so large that it attracts most of the immune system antibodies -- which then slip off when it mutates.

Because of the mutations, vaccines have to be reformulated every year and the viruses can develop resistance to antiviral drugs.

The antibodies found by Wilson's group and the U.S. team earlier this week attach to the "stick" of the hemagglutinin lollipop. This mutates less than the head, and so provides less of a moving target.

In both studies, the antibody suppressed a range of flu viruses, including H5N1 avian flu and the currently circulating H1N1 seasonal flu virus, although they did not work well against another seasonal flu virus called H3N2.

Wilson's team and Crucell Holland found their antibody, called CR6261, in the blood of people who had been vaccinated with the ordinary seasonal flu vaccine.

Similar antibodies have now also been found in other people, but it is not clear how well they protect people from flu or whether some people's bodies use them more efficiently than others.

Both groups said their antibodies provide a way to treat people infected with flu, as well as a route to designing better drugs and vaccines. (Reporting by Maggie Fox; Additional reporting by Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago; Editing by Eric Walsh)








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